Conferences, Workshops, Seminars

Call for Applications: 2017 Leffell Seminar

Call for Applications: 2017 Leffell Seminar on the Impact of Israel upon American Jewry (August 7-9, 2017)

Deadline: April 7, 2017

How has Israel shaped the culture, religious expression, political and organizational life, and self-understanding of American Jews between 1948 and the present? This subject will be explored at a three day seminar sponsored by The Lisa and Michael Leffell Foundation, August 7-9, 2017 in White Plains, New York.

Facilitated by senior academic faculty and leading opinion-makers, the seminar invites applicants from a broad range of disciplinary backgrounds in the humanities and social sciences. All transportation and lodging expenses will be provided by the Foundation. Seminar presenters will receive $2,500 stipend for their participation. Early and mid-career academic, advanced graduate students, and thought leaders are invited to submit an application by April 7, 2017 with notification of accepted for the seminar by April 30, 2017.

For more information, contact spopovsky@leffellfoundation.org or visit israeled.org/leffell-seminar.

Brown University: Revisiting the Questions of Jewish Origins

The Program in Judaic Studies at Brown University will host a conference entitled “Revisiting the Question of Jewish Origins: Myth/Construct/Reality” on March 20-21, 2017 at The Faculty Club, One Magee Street, Providence, Rhode Island.

The Jews have one of the longest continuously recorded histories of any people in the world, but what do we actually know about their origins? This multi-disciplinary symposium aims to bring together new research on the question of Jewish origin from a range of fields, including historical studies, archaeology, and genetics.

All conference sessions are open to the public. Any questions should be addressed to Katharina Galor at katharina_galor@brown.edu.

Call for Submissions: EAJS Conference Grant Programme

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The European Association for Jewish Studies (EAJS) invites submissions to the EAJS Conference Grant Programme in European Jewish Studies for the 2017-2018 academic year. The purpose of the program is to foster cooperation among scholars involved in Jewish Studies across Europe, and to support early career researchers in this field to develop a professional network.

The grants can cover two academic events: The EAJS Conferences and EAJS Summer Schools. The grants are used to cover an individual event; funds can be requested for travel expenses, accommodations and maintenance of the active participants. Academic excellence and the impact on network building in Jewish Studies in Europe will be key criteria; international cooperation in the development proposals is strongly encouraged.

Deadline: April 20, 2017.

For more information on application materials, the program itself, or general inquiries, you can visit the EAJS website page dedicated to this grant program. Inquiries about the program itself can also be directed to admin@eurojewishstudies.org.

Contested Citizenship – An Interdisciplinary Conference

This conference brings together scholars from a variety of fields to address how citizenship has operated as a terrain of struggle in the United States and the Americas. Topics include state violence and incarceration, undocumented students and workers, and the role of empire and transnational capitalism on migration and racial formation.

Speakers include Cesar Abadia, Alicia Schmidt Camacho, Robert Chase, Aviva Chomsky, Iyko Day, Christina Heatherton, Melanie Newport, Mark Overmyer-Velázquez, and Cindy Wu.

The Keynote Address will be given by Vijay Prashad, who is professor of international studies at Trinity College. He is the author of The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South.

Keynote Address: March 30, 5:30pm

Panels: March 31, 9:00am – 3:15pm

Location: UConn Alumni House

This conference is sponsored by El Instituto, American Studies, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Registration is free at http://elin.uconn.edu/contested-citizenship.

A Call for Papers on Medicine in the Bible and Talmud

The Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) and the European Association of Biblical Studies  (EABS) are calling for papers for their 2017 International Meeting in Berlin, Germany from August 8th through the 11th. They are inviting papers on the theme of “literary and discursive framing of concepts of medical knowledge in late Antiquity,” extending from biblical and apocryphal texts, into later Jewish, Rabbinic-Talmudic traditions and beyond.

The organizers of the meeting are welcoming presentations on the representation and embedding of medical (and other) knowledge in particular texts and contexts. Papers may address the special design of such knowledge discourses: How does the use of rhetoric strategies, literary structures, or genres in scientific texts affect the ideas conveyed? Could a specific hermeneutic not only serve as a ‘container’ but also as a method for knowledge acquisition?

Deadline for Paper Submission: February 22, 2017

Membership is required in either SBL or EABS at the time of the proposal, through to the meeting. The full text of the call for papers can be found on EABS’s website. More information about the meeting and program requirements can be found on SBL’s website.

 

Afro-Jewish Studies Association Calls for Summer 2017 Papers

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The Afro-Jewish Studies Association is calling for papers to be submitted for the Caribbean Philosophical Association’s annual meeting in Jamaica from June 22 to June 24, 2017. This year’s general theme is “Theorizing Livity, Decolonizing Freedom,” however all topic related to Afro-Jewish life are welcome.

Proposals related to the Afro-Jewish Studies Association should be submitted to the Caribbean Philosophical Association’s website. Questions about the conference can also be directed to caribphil2017@gmail.com.

Deadline: December 19, 2016

2016 IAJGS Conference in Seattle – 8/7/16

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The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies is very excited that this summer’s conference  will be held in Seattle, WA, USA, from August 7 – 12, 2016.  This annual conference brings together family searchers, academics, professional genealogists, historians, and a wide variety of individuals form around the world who cherish the heritage and future of the Jewish people.

This year’s conference includes some 325 events during the week– lectures, presentations, meal events and computer workshops – nearly 250 of them hosted by a speaker or panel.

For more information or to register for the conference, click here.

Society for Sefardic Studies Annual Conference in Jerusalem

SefaradOn Tuesday, May 31, 2016, the Society for Sefardic Studies at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem will be presenting its annual conference.
 
“The aim of this conference is to clarify and analyze the Sefardic context of the term “egodocument” and also to expose the variety of literary expressions of egodocuments in Iberia and in the Sefardic diaspora from the middle ages to modern times.”
 
For more information, click here.

May 5: 2016 Teaching the Holocaust and Genocide from a Global Perspective Workshop

2016 Teaching the Holocaust and Genocide from a Global Perspective Workshop

Thursday, May 5, 2016
8:30AM – 5:00PM

Genocide Workshop presentation Thomas J. Dodd Research Center

Registration is now open for the 2016 Teaching the Holocaust and Genocide from a Global Perspective workshop presented by the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut.  Visit their website for more information and to register.

Guided by international experts, this workshop will provide participants the opportunity to explore new theories, resources, and approaches for teaching the Holocaust and genocide from a global perspective.  Featuring engaging presentations, two hands-on, break-out workshops, and a public keynote lecture, the day will be an inspirational, informative, and practical experience for educators. Outcomes for participants will include new capacity for curriculum design appropriate for a variety of grades and content areas, access to resources and materials for use in the classroom, and ongoing support for professional development in human rights education through the Dodd Center.


 

Workshop is free of charge and open to enrollment by pre-service and in-service teachers of all grades and content areas.

Workshop examples and tools will be most appropriate toLanguage Arts and Social Studies teachers at the middle and high school level.


Presenters Include:

Dr. Shalmi Barmore

Founding Director of Education Programs, Yad Vashem, Israel

Professor Zehavit Gross

UNESCO Chair-holder, Education for Human Values, Tolerance and Peace, Bar-Ilan University, Israel

Ms. Nela Navarro

Director of Education & Lecturer, Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights, UNESCO Chair in Genocide Prevention, Rutgers University, USA

Professor Sebastian Wogenstein

Associate Professor of German, Department of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, University of Connecticut, USA

 

Call for Papers – Brown Religious Studies Graduate Student Conference

This conference seeks to explore and bridge the surprising gap between “genealogy” and “family” in the study of
religion. Developments in contemporary scholarship include elaborations and critiques of genealogy, new approaches to the identification and mapping of known genealogies (including digital and graphic representations), and a growing interest in the ritual and narrative construction of lineages.

Simultaneously, increased attention has been given to the materiality of religion practiced in the home and the role
of the family as a locus for individual and communal formation. Conversations about genealogy and family often
appear disengaged from one another and can become embedded in problematic dichotomies. Genealogy implies patrilineal descent, while “domestic religion” is often used synonymously with “women’s religion.” Similarly, genealogy is associated with science, history, and rationality; family with emotion, daily life, and nature. Why have “family” and “genealogy” been bifurcated in religious studies? What can we learn from bringing them back together?

By approaching these topics in tandem, we hope to engender critical reflection about the subtle relationships between “families” and “genealogies,” and to interrogate the prevailing split that seems to separate the two. We welcome papers on the topics listed below, as well as contributions on related issues. Papers might approach these topics through a variety of theoretical lenses: affect theory, feminist and queer theory, spatial theory, materialist approaches, political theory,  theology, critical race theory, ethics, etc.

For more information, click here.