Faculty

Core Faculty

 

Sebastian Wogenstein is Interim Director of the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life and Associate Professor of German and Comparative Literature.  He is a faculty associate of the Human Rights Institute and was a 2012/2013 fellow at the Humanities Institute. He is Secretary-Treasurer of the North American Heine Society and member of the MLA’s Executive Committee on European Literary Relations. He is a senator in the University Senate and chair of the Senate Enrollment Committee. 

His research and teaching focuses on 20th-century German literature with emphasis on German-Jewish literature, theater, and the intersection of literature and human rights. 

sebastian.wogenstein@uconn.edu

(860) 486-9262

 

Stuart S. Miller is the Academic Director at the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life, Professor of Hebrew, History, and Judaic Studies, and Chair of the Hebrew and Judaic Studies (HEJS) section in the Department of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages.  

His specialties include Greco-Roman Palestine, rabbinic/Talmudic literature, and the history of Judaism.  He has conducted archaeological digs in Sepphoris, Israel, and Chesterfield, Connecticut, serving for many years on the staff of the Sepphoris Regional Project in Israel.

stuart.miller@uconn.edu

(860) 486-3386


 

Nehama

Nehama Aschkenasy is the Director of the Center for Judaic and Middle Eastern Studies at UConn-Stamford and Professor of Comparative Literary and Cultural Languages. 

Her areas of specialty include Hebraic literature, Bible as literature, women in Hebraic and western literature, comparative literary theory, literature and religion, literature and politics, and modern Hebrew and Judaic Literatures.

nehama.aschkenasy@uconn.edu

(203) 251-8435

Susan Einbinder

Susan Einbinder is Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies and Comparative Literature.  

Her areas of specialty include: Hebrew literature from medieval Europe, especially France, Provence, and Iberia; literary responses to persecution, expulsion, and trauma; memory and literature; history and literature; Hebrew literature and its vernacular analogues and contexts; the writings of medieval Jewish physicians; and Hebrew translation as a medium of cultural exchange.

susan.einbinder@uconn.edu

(860) 486-9249

Affiliated Hebrew and Judaic Studies Faculty

Philip Balma is Associate Professor of Italian Literary and Cultural Studies, as well as the undergraduate Italian Program Coordinator and ECE Italian Faculty Coordinator.  

His areas of specialty include literary and cinematic representations of the Jewish experience in contemporary Italy, Holocaust studies, artistic representations of WWII, artistic representations of anti-Semitism, translation studies, contemporary Italian literature and film, postcolonial studies, literature of migration, and Jewish experience in contemporary Italophone literature and film.

philip.balma@uconn.edu

(860) 486-1531

Joel Blatt

Joel Blatt is Associate Professor of History at UConn-Stamford. 

He has published a number of articles on France and Italy between the two world wars. He has received a number of grants from the UConn Research Foundation and has served a Provost’s Fellowship. He is twice the recipient of the UConn-Stamford Campus Outstanding Teacher Award.

 joel.blatt@uconn.edu

Maha Darawsha

Maha Darawsha is Instructor of Arabic.  

She teaches courses in modern Arabic culture and traditional Arabic literature and civilization.

maha.darawsha@uconn.edu

(860) 486-3314

Arnold Dashefsky is the founding Director of the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life. He is currently professor emeritus of sociology and continues to teach Sociology of anti-Semitism. He is the co-editor of the American Jewish Year Book.

His research interests include Jewish identity, family, ethnicity, emigration, interfaith marriage, and philanthropy. 

arnold.dashefsky@uconn.edu

Daniel Hershenzon

Daniel Hershenzon is Professor of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages.

His specialties include the history of early modern Spain and the Mediterranean; the relations between the Spanish Monarchy and North Africa; slavery and captivity; Jewish, Muslim and Christian cultural intermediaries; conversion; and writing and its uses. 

daniel.hershenzon@uconn.edu

(860) 486-9243

Sara Johnson is Professor of Greek and Hellenistic Judaism.  

Her areas of specialty include Hellenistic Jewish literature and culture and ethnic identity in the Hellenistic world. 

sara.johnson@uconn.edu

(860) 486-3314

Charles Lansing is Associate Professor of History.

His research interests include Germany in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, especially the Third Reich and the postwar German states; the Holocaust; European intellectual and social history; European imperialism and colonialism; and education in modern Europe.  

charles.lansing@uconn.edu

Fred Roden

Fred Roden is Professor of English at the UConn-Stamford campus.

His research interests include religion and literature, Victorian literature and culture, LGBT studies, and  Holocaust studies.    

frederick.roden@uconn.edu

Sherry Shamash is Instructor of Hebrew.  

She teaches an advanced Hebrew course with emphasis on Jewish culture and history as well as language.  

sherry.shamash@uconn.edu

(860) 486-3279

Grae Sibelman is Adjunct Instructor in Judaic Studies.

Her specialties include modern drama, dramatic representation of the Holocaust, and playwriting.

grae.sibelman@uconn.edu

John Thames is Adjunct Instructor of Biblical Hebrew.

His current research examines cuneiform ritual texts excavated from the ancient Syrian city of Emar and their significance for understanding Late Bronze Age politics and the politics of rituals in ancient Israel. John has previously studied the Hebrew Bible and ancient Near East at Yale University and Louisiana State University. He has also participated in archaeological excavations in Israel (Ashkelon) and Turkey (Tell Tayinat).

john.thames@uconn.edu

 

Sarah Willen is Associate Professor of Anthropology.

Her research interests include medical and sociocultural anthropology, transnational migration and migrant “illegality,” immigration and health, biopolitics and social exclusion, health and human rights, reproductive health, embodiment and experience, moral economies of “deservingness,” the American “cultural competence” movement, and the Middle East.

sarah.willen@uconn.edu