Author: Joscha Jelitzki

The Last Laugh: Film Screening | April 1, 2020

The Last Laugh
 

Film Screening and book launch

with Ferne Pearlstein, Robert Edwards, and Avinoam Patt

Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Time: 7:00-9:00 pm

Place: Mandell JCC, 335 Bloomfield Avenue, West Hartford

The screening of The Last Laugh (2016, documentary film, 88 minutes) will be followed by a discussion and book launch with  film director Ferne Pearlstein and producer Robert Edwards in conversation with Dr. Avinoam Patt. Dr. Patt is co-editor of the new book Laughter After: Humor and the Holocaust (Wayne State University Press, 2020) to which both Pearlstein and Edwards contributed.

The program is sponsored by the Mandell JCC, the Maurice Greenberg Center for Judaic Studies annual Singer Jewish Humor Lecture, and the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life.

For more information, please contact Jill Ziplow at 860.231.6339 or jziplow@mandelljcc.org.

Israeli Author Ayelet Tsabari to Present “Language, Longing, and Belonging” | February 18, 2020

Tsabari Headshot

Award-winning Israeli author Ayelet Tsabari will present "Language, Longing, and Belonging,"  a discussion of her new, critically acclaimed memoir The Art of Leaving.

Date: Tuesday, February 18, 2020 

Time: 4:30 pm

Place: Trinity College, Mather Hall, Wean Terrace Rooms ABC, 300 Summit Street, Hartford

The event is free and open to the public. The talk is sponsored by the Distinguished Scholar lecture by the Department of Language and Culture Studies at Trinity College, ALEPH: The Institute of Jewish Ideas, and the UConn Center for Judaic Studies.

For more information, please contact Lidija Petrus at 860-297-5121 or lidija.petrus@trincoll.edu.

About the Book 

In The Art of Leaving, Tsabari tells her story, from her early love of writing and words, to her rebellion during her mandatory service in the Israeli army. She travels from Israel to New York, Canada, Thailand, and India, falling in and out of love with countries, men and women, drugs and alcohol, running away from responsibilities and refusing to settle in one place. She recounts her first marriage, her struggle to define herself as a writer in a new language, her decision to become a mother, and finally her rediscovery and embrace of her family history--a history marked by generations of headstrong women who struggled to choose between their hearts and their homes. Eventually, she realizes that she must reconcile the memories of her father and the sadness of her past if she is ever going to come to terms with herself.

About the Author 

Ayelet Tsabari was born in Israel to a large family of Yemeni descent. She is the author of the memoir in essays The Art of Leaving, finalist for the Writer’s Trust Hilary Weston Prize, winner of the Canadian Jewish Literary Award for memoir, and an Apple Books and Kirkus Review Best Book of 2019. Her first book, The Best Place on Earth, won the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature and the Edward Lewis Wallant Award, and was long listed to the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. The book was a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice, a Kirkus Review Best Book of 2016, and has been published internationally.

“How Yiddish Changed America and America Changed Yiddish” with Ilan Stavans and Josh Lambert | March 18, 2020

Cover Yiddish EventHow Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish - Join us for a book presentation with Josh Lambert and Ilan Stavans!
Details
Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2020, 7:00 pm
Place: Mandell JCC, 335 Bloomfield Avenue, West Hartford
About the Event
Prof. Josh Lambert (UMass Amherst) and Prof. Ilan Stavans (Amherst College) will discuss their new book, How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish—a diverse anthology of the influences and inspirations of Yiddish voices in America—radical, dangerous, and seductive, but also sweet, generous, and full of life. The book will be published at Restless Books in January 2020- read more about the book here!
The event is sponsored by Aleph: Institute for Jewish Ideas, the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life, and the Jewish Hartford European Roots Project.

Berel Lang to Present “Against the Lachrymose View of Jewish History—Again” | March 11, 2020

Please join us for the Gene and Georgia Mittelman Lecture in Judaic Studies, presented by Professor Berel Lang on "Against the Lachrymose View of Jewish HistoryAgain."

Details

Date: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 | 1:30-3:30 pm
Place: Babbidge Library, Class of '47 Room, UConn Storrs

This event is free and open to the public. A kosher lunch will be served.

About the Talk:

The historian Salo Baron attacked the "lachrymose view of Jewish history" as mistakenly focused on events or practices of persecution and violence in that history--at the same time providing strong evidence that still more basic factors shaped the history of Jewish flourishing and survival.  But the same lachrymose view still dominates current popular Jewish understanding, and this has (on the talk's claim) severe, even dangerous practical consequences.

About the Speaker:

Professor of Philosophy Emeritus, SUNY at Albany (BA, Yale; Ph.D, Columbia). Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University, University of Connecticut, Wesleyan.  Author of twelve books, including 'Writing and the Moral Self', 'Act and Idea in the Nazi Genocide', 'The Anatomy of Philosophical Style', 'Writing and the Holocaust', and 'Primo Levi:  The Matter of a Life'.

If you require an accommodation to participate, please contact Pamela Weathers at pamela.weathes@uconn.edu or 860-486-2271.

Esteemed Holocaust Scholar Christopher Browning to Speak at UConn April 20, 2020

Hall of Names Exhibit

 

On Monday, April 20, 2020, at 5:00 pm, world-renowned Holocaust expert Professor Emeritus Christopher Browning will present "Holocaust History and Survivor Testimony 75 Years After Liberation" for the UConn Center for Judaic Studies annual Academic Convocation on the Holocaust. The annual Holocaust remembrance lecture is made possible by the I. Martin and Janet M. Fierberg Fund.

The lecture will be held in the Student Union Theater on the Storrs campus and is free and open to the public. Preceding the event, a reception will be held from 4:00-5:00 pm at the UConn Foundation

On this evening, we will also mark the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life and recognize the many accomplishments of the Center over the past four decades, building on our past to prepare a bright future for students at UConn.

About the Speaker:

Christopher Browning is UNC-Chapel Hill Frank Porter Graham Professor Emeritus. The author of multiple texts on the history of the Holocaust, he is most well known for Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland, which has become a required text for any class dealing with the history of the Holocaust. Browning’s research focuses on Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. He has written extensively about three issues: first, Nazi decision- and policy-making in regard to the origins of the Final Solution; second, the behavior and motives of various middle- and lower-echelon personnel involved in implementing Nazi Jewish policy; and thirdly, the use of survivor testimony to explore Jewish responses and survival strategies.

Dr. Marion Kaplan to lecture on Jewish Refugees in Portugal | Jan. 29, 2020 (Storrs)

Kaplan Book Cover

Please join us for a talk with NYU historian Dr. Marion Kaplan who will present the UConn Center for Judaic Studies Gene and Georgia Mittelman Lecture in Judaic Studies on Hitler's Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal. 

The event is free and open to the public. Attendance counts toward honors credit.

Date: Wednesday, January 29, 2020
Time: 1:45 pm
Place: Class of '47 Room, Babbidge Library, UConn Storrs

Exhibition opening “Beyond Duty” and reception will follow the lecture at 3:00 pm in the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center (across the courtyard from Class of 1947 Room, Babbidge Library).

The exhibition, curated by the Consulate General of Israel to New England and timed for the United Nations International Holocaust Remembrance Day on Jan. 27, is co-sponsored by UConn Global Affairs and the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center. It will run through March 1. Center Director Avinoam Patt will provide introductory remarks.

About the Talk: Hitler's Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal depicts the travails of refugees escaping Nazi Europe and awaiting their fate in Portugal. Drawing attention not only to the social and physical upheavals of refugee existence, it also highlights their feelings as they fled their homes and histories while begging strangers for kindness. Portugal’s dictator, António de Oliveira Salazar, admitted tens of thousands of Jews fleeing westward but set his secret police on those who did not move on quickly. Yet Portugal’s people left a lasting impression on refugees as caring and generous.

An emotional history of fleeing, the book probes how specific locations touched refugees’ inner lives, including the borders they nervously crossed, the consulate lines they fretfully waited on, the smoky cafés they uneasily inhabited, or the overcrowded transatlantic ships that signaled their liberation. These sites induced feelings of frustration or relief – often both.

Life in limbo has at its core anxiety and fear, but also courage and resilience. Most refugees in Portugal showed strength and stamina as they faced unimagined challenges. For them, Lisbon emerged as a site of temporality and transition, a “no-man’s-land” between a painful past and a hopeful future. Paying careful attention to the words of refugees in Portugal may help us to understand Jewish heartbreak and perseverance in the 1940s and also to listen compassionately to refugees’ stories in our own times.

About the Speaker: Marion Kaplan is the Skirball Professor of Modern Jewish History at NYU. She is a three-time National Jewish Book Award winner for The Making of the Jewish Middle Class: Women, Family and Identity in Imperial Germany (1991), Between Dignity and Despair: Jewish Life in Nazi Germany (1998), and Gender and Jewish History (with Deborah Dash Moore, 2011) as well as a finalist for Dominican Haven: The Jewish Refugee Settlement in Sosua (2008). Her other publications include: The Jewish Feminist Movement in Germany, Jewish Daily Life in Germany, 1618-1945 (ed.), and Jüdische Welten: Juden in Deutschland vom 18. Jahrhundert bis in die Gegenwart (with Beate Meyer, 2005). She has edited several other books on German-Jewish and women’s history and has taught courses on German-Jewish history, European women’s history, German and European history, as well as European Jewish history, and Jewish women’s history. Her newest book, Hitler’s Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal, 1940-45 (Yale University Press) will be released in January, 2020. 

If you require an accommodation to participate, please contact Pamela Weathers at pamela.weathers@uconn.edu or 860-486-2271.

Dr. Marion Kaplan to lecture on Jewish Refugees in Portugal | Jan. 28, 2020 (UConn Stamford)

Kaplan Book CoverPlease join us for a talk with NYU historian Dr. Marion Kaplan who will present the UConn Center for Judaic Studies Maria and Ishier Jacobson Lecture on Hitler's Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal. At this lecture, clothing donations will be accepted for UConn Stamford's biannual Professional Clothing Drive, which benefits UConn students in need of attire for interviews, work, and internships.

Date: Tuesday, January 28, 2020
Time: Reception 5:00 pm, Talk 6:00 pm
Place: Main Auditorium (A1), UConn Stamford

Dr. Kaplan will also present this program at UConn Storrs the following day, Wednesday 1/29

About the Talk: Hitler's Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal depicts the travails of refugees escaping Nazi Europe and awaiting their fate in Portugal. Drawing attention not only to the social and physical upheavals of refugee existence, it also highlights their feelings as they fled their homes and histories while begging strangers for kindness. Portugal’s dictator, António de Oliveira Salazar, admitted tens of thousands of Jews fleeing westward but set his secret police on those who did not move on quickly. Yet Portugal’s people left a lasting impression on refugees as caring and generous.

An emotional history of fleeing, the book probes how specific locations touched refugees’ inner lives, including the borders they nervously crossed, the consulate lines they fretfully waited on, the smoky cafés they uneasily inhabited, or the overcrowded transatlantic ships that signaled their liberation. These sites induced feelings of frustration or relief – often both.
Life in limbo has at its core anxiety and fear, but also courage and resilience. Most refugees in Portugal showed strength and stamina as they faced unimagined challenges. For them, Lisbon emerged as a site of temporality and transition, a “no-man’s-land” between a painful past and a hopeful future. Paying careful attention to the words of refugees in Portugal may help us to understand Jewish heartbreak and perseverance in the 1940s and also to listen compassionately to refugees’ stories in our own times.
About the Speaker: Marion Kaplan is the Skirball Professor of Modern Jewish History at NYU. She is a three-time National Jewish Book Award winner for The Making of the Jewish Middle Class: Women, Family and Identity in Imperial Germany (1991), Between Dignity and Despair: Jewish Life in Nazi Germany (1998), and Gender and Jewish History (with Deborah Dash Moore, 2011) as well as a finalist for Dominican Haven: The Jewish Refugee Settlement in Sosua (2008). Her other publications include: The Jewish Feminist Movement in Germany, Jewish Daily Life in Germany, 1618-1945 (ed.), and Jüdische Welten: Juden in Deutschland vom 18. Jahrhundert bis in die Gegenwart (with Beate Meyer, 2005). She has edited several other books on German-Jewish and women’s history and has taught courses on German-Jewish history, European women’s history, German and European history, as well as European Jewish history, and Jewish women’s history. Her newest book, Hitler’s Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal, 1940-45 (Yale University Press) will be released in January, 2020. 

The lecture is free and open to the public. If you require an accommodation to participate, please contact Stamford Coordinator for Judaic Studies Prof. Fred Roden at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or 203-251-8559.

UConn Brain and Behavior in Tel Aviv, Israel, Summer 2020

UConn Brain and Behavior in Tel Aviv is a summer study abroad program that provides students the opportunity to pursue their studies in Psychology, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, PreMed, or PNB in Israel. The program is led by Dr. Etan Markus (UConn Psychology) together with colleagues at Tel Aviv University. Participants will take a UConn psychology class supplemented with a second, Tel Aviv University, course focused on regional history and/or culture as well as organized activities, tours, and an Israeli dinner/cooking class.

All coursework and activities will be conducted in English.  

There will be an information session on Monday, February 24, 5:00-6:00 pm in Bousfield 162. 

Learn more at the program website: https://tausummerneuroscience.uconn.edu/

TAU Summer Flyer