Stamford Events

Reflections on the Work of Philip Roth by Dr. Sondra Melzer 11/21

 

Image Philip Roth

Sondra Melzer: Reflections on the Work of Philip Roth

November 21
12:30 pm
MPR, UConn Stamford

Philip Roth, 1933-2018, was an American novelist and short story writer. In her talk, Dr. Sondra Melzer will discuss Roth's focus on Jewish life throughout his storied career, the writings of which made him one of the most celebrated writers of his generation.

Dr. Sondra Melzer completed her PhD at NYU. She is the author of The Rhetoric of Rage: Women In Dorothy Parker. She spent 39 years as a public high school teacher, was an instructor at the University of Connecticut, and ran the Sacred Heart University Education Program. In 2017, upon completing 60 years of teaching, she was named Professor Emerita at Sacred Heart University.

The event by the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life is free and open to the pubic. If you require an accommodation, please contact Stamford Coordinator for Judaic Studies Professor Fred Roden at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or 203-251-8559.

From Generation to Generation – Panel Discussion with Roland Tec, November 5, UConn Stamford

FROM GENERATION TO GENERATIONSpeaker Roland Tec

Join Dr. Joel Blatt and Dr. Fred Roden in conversation with filmmaker Roland Tec, son of Professor Emerita Nechama Tec, as he discusses her Holocaust memoir, Dry Tears, recounts his work on the film adaptation of her resistance classic Defiance, and reflects on legacies in families of survivors. Read more about her [book].

The event will take place November 5, 5.30-6.30 pm, at the UConn Stamford Campus, A1 Main Auditorium.

 

About the Speaker

Filmmaker and producer Roland Tec is an Assistant Professor in the MFA Program in Playwriting at Hollins University and is a Dramatists Guild Institute faculty member. His film producer credits include Mira Nair's Monsoon Wedding and Edward Zwick's Defiance. He wrote, directed, and produced feature films All the Rage and We Pedal Uphill. Professor Tec has taught at Harvard and Brandeis and was a fellow at the Byrdcliffe Artists Colony and at the MacDowell Colony.

This program is part of the UConn Judaic Studies Scholarship and the Arts Series. Attendance counts toward honors credit.

If you require an accommodation to participate, please contact Stamford coordinator for Judaic Studies Prof. Frederick Roden: frederick.roden@uconn.edu, or 203-251-8559.

Lecture by Professor Nehama Aschkenasy on Aharon Appelfeld and Amos Oz, November 12, UConn Stamford

profile SchkenasyOn Tuesday, November 12, UConn Professor Emerita Nehama Aschkenasy will give a talk on "National Identity and Private Histories: The Fiction and Lives of Aharon Appelfeld and Amos Oz." The talk will be held at the UConn Stamford campus in the Multi-Purpose Room (MPR) from 7:00-8:00 pm. Attendance qualifies for honors credit.

The talk is free and open to the public. If you require an accommodation, please contact Stamford Coordinator for Judaic Studies Professor Fred Roden at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or 203-251-8559.

About the Talk

This lecture is a tribute to the two giants of Israeli literature, Aharon Appelfeld (1923-2018) and Amos Oz (1939-2018), demonstrating how their lives and fictions were shaped by and intertwined with the two momentous events in recent Jewish history: the Holocaust (in the case of Appelfeld) and the birth of the State of Israel (for Oz). Their stories reveal the cultural and socio-psychological spirit of contemporary Israel as it wrestles with its national, ethnic, and moral identity.

About the Speaker

Dr. Nehama Aschkenasy is Professor Emerita of Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies at UConn, where she taught courses in literature and religion. She is Founding Director Emerita of the former Center for Judaic and Middle Eastern Studies at UConn Stamford. Aschkenasy published four books, among them the award-winning Eve's Journey, and has contributed numerous chapters to books and journals. Her essay on the Bible's role in modern Israeli culture, "Recreating the Canon," is included in the Posen Library (Yale University Press). She has served as Associative Editor of several scholarly journals in the US and the UK.

Talk by Cathy Buerger on Dangerous Speech, November 12

Cathy BuergerOn Tuesday, November 12, anthropologist and Senior Researcher of the Dangerous Speech Project (DSP) Cathy Buerger will present "Fear and Loathing in our Discourse: Dangerous Speech, Division, and What to Do about It." The talk will be held at the UConn Stamford campus in the Multi-Purpose Room (MPR) from 12:30-2:00 pm.  

The talk is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life. If you require an accommodation, please contact Stamford Coordinator for Judaic Studies Professor Fred Roden at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or 203-251-8559. Attendance qualifies for honors credit.

 

About the Talk

No one is born hating or fearing other people. That has to be taught – and those harmful lessons seem to be similar, though they’re given in highly disparate cultures, languages, and places. Leaders around the world use particular kinds of rhetoric to turn groups of people violently against one another. But this rhetoric is, of course, nothing new. The vocabulary varies, but the same themes recur: members of other groups are depicted as threats so serious that violence against them comes to seem acceptable or even necessary. In this talk, drawing from both historical and contemporary examples, Dr. Cathy Buerger will outline a framework for identifying dangerous speech – any form of expression that can increase the risk that its audience will condone or commit violence against members of another group. The lecture will conclude with a discussion of productive responses to dangerous and otherwise harmful speech.

About the Speaker

Cathy Buerger is a Senior Researcher at the Dangerous Speech Project (DSP), a Washington, DC-based NGO that studies the relationship between speech and violence. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Connecticut, where her research examined how civil society activists work together to support positive norms and to uphold human rights. Her current research at the DSP focuses on civil society responses to dangerous and hateful speech online. She is a Research Affiliate of UConn's Economic and Social Rights Research Group, Managing Editor of the Journal of Human Rights, and an Editor for the Teaching Human Rights Database.

Lecture by Professor Steven Wander on Josephus and His Influence on Early Medieval Art, September 9, UConn Stamford

Steven WanderOn Monday, September 9, UConn Stamford Professor Steven Wander will present "Flavius Josephus, Jewish Historian of the First Century, and his Influence on Imperial Roman and Early Medieval Art." The talk will be held at the UConn Stamford campus in the Multi-Purpose Room (MPR) from 5:00-6:00 pm.  

The talk is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life. If you require an accommodation, please contact Stamford Coordinator for Judaic Studies Professor Fred Roden at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or 203-251-8559.

About the Talk

Art History Professor Dr. Wander will speak on the texts of Josephus concerning some of the most important artworks to survive: The Arch of Titus in Rome, the rear panel of the Franks (Auzon) Casket, and the Codex Amiatinus.

About the Speaker

Steven H. Wander, currently an adjunct professor of Art and Art History at the University of Connecticut, Stamford, holds a master's degree in medieval Art History from the University of California, Berkeley, and a PhD from Stanford University. Previously, he was a professor at the University of California, Irvine, where he taught advanced courses in medieval art, his specialty. Wander has published widely in the field with books, articles, and scholarly reviews. His recent work includes three papers on the influence of Josephus on artworks of the Middle Ages and a critical edition of the Joshua Roll. His paper in the Metropolitan Museum Journal is the basis for their display of seventh-century imperial silver plates and won the annual faculty award from the Medieval and Renaissance Center at UCLA. He has also received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Fulbright program.

Joel Blatt to Present “Mussolini, Italian Fascism, and the Jewish Question” Sept. 17, 2019

Joel BlattOn Tuesday, September 17, UConn Stamford Professor Joel Blatt will present "Mussolini, Italian Fascism, and the Jewish Question." The talk will be held at the UConn Stamford campus in the Multi-Purpose Room (MPR) from 6:00-8:00 pm.  

The talk is free and open to the public.  It is sponsored by the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life and the Jewish Historical Society of Fairfield County. If you require an accommodation, please contact Stamford Coordinator for Judaic Studies Professor Fred Roden at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or 203-251-8559.

About the Talk

This lecture will discuss the fate of Jews in fascist Italy from 1922-1945,tracing Mussolini's accelerated anti-Semitism from 1934 to the 1938 laws which ended Jewish emancipation. From September 1943 until the end of April 1945, about 15% of the Jews in Italy were murdered. This lecture will analyze Mussolini's shifting policies. The talk will also discuss Carlo and Nello Rosselli (two different kinds of anti-fascist resisters) and their mother Amelia Pincherle Rosselli. 

About the Speaker

Professor Joel Blatt teaches European History at the UConn Stamford Campus. A historian of the 20th century, his courses include the Holocaust, Personality and Power, and Fascism/Anti-Fascism in Italy and Nazi Germany (among others). He is editor of The French Defeat of 1940: Reassessments and author of a number of articles. His current project is a book on the assassination of the anti-fascist Italian Jewish Rosselli brothers. He has received numerous awards for his outstanding teaching and service at UConn-Stamford. 

 

Traditional Religion, Progressive Politics: A Panel Chaired by Professor Beth Ginsberg, March 7, 2019

On March 7, from 12:30 - 2:00 pm, at UConn Stamford (rm 129), a panel discussion "Traditional Religion, Progressive Politics" will be chaired by Professor Beth Ginsberg. Lunch will be served.

Political Science research has identified religiously observant individuals by using two measures: how often they attend religious services and how important they state religion is in their lives. Studies demonstrate that most people who are frequent attendees and for whom religion plays a very important role tend to be politically conservative. They often vote for Republican candidates and support more right-wing causes.

However, what happens when the opposite is true? Are there people who are traditionally religiously observant yet politically liberal or progressive? How do they reconcile their political beliefs with their religion? Join us as we hear from people who identify with traditional religious denominations yet who are politically progressive or liberal.

The event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life.

If you require an accommodation to participate, please contact Stamford Coordinator for Judaic Studies Prof. Fred Roden at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or 203-251-8559.

About the Panelists

Elad NehoraiElad Nehorai

Elad Nehorai has spent most of his adult life creating and nurturing communities. From the time he started a small online arts magazine (before such a thing was common) in college, to his efforts as an online marketer for startups, to his viral campaign "I Have A Therapist," to his present-day work with Hevria, a community for creative Jews, and Torah Trumps Hate, a community for progressive orthodox Jews, Elad cares about nothing more than connecting people who are desperately looking for a community that doesn't exist in the physical world.

Elad is also a prolific writer. He is a columnist for the Forward, a blogger, and has been published in places like the Guardian and Haaretz.

Elad's work has been viewed by over 10 million people, and has been discussed in places like ABC World News, BBC Radio, Mashable, the New York Daily News, Tablet, and more.


Debbie PaulsDebbie Pauls, LCSW 

Debbie Pauls since 1978 has informally, and sometime formally, been a minister with the Stamford Church of Christ, where her husband, Dale Pauls, is currently Minister Emeritus. Her involvements in the church have included teaching, mentoring, providing counseling for church members in crisis or who may be experiencing various life changes. Along with her husband, they have provided hospitality in their home to numerous people, ranging from a few nights to two years. Helping people who are new to the church find their unique way of developing and contributing their gifts and talents has been a particular interest to her.

In her professional life, Debbie is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who is now in private practice specializing in trauma recovery. This specialization has come out of ten years of being the clinical director of the Sexual Assault Crisis Center and developing a volunteer staff who responded to hotline calls and led support groups.

Currently, she also enjoys being a grandmother to three children ranging from 9 to 4 years of age. As she moves toward retirement she is finding ways to affect government policy related to mental health and the criminal justice system.

 

Rev Ray RodenRev. Raymond P. Roden, PsyD

Father Ray Roden was born in 1951 and raised in Brooklyn, NY. He was ordained a priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn in 1981 and served in inner city parishes in particular and among those living on society's periphery in general from the beginning of his ministry. He earned a doctorate in clinical psychology from Yeshiva University in 2000 with a specialized professional interest in adolescent anger, depression and suicide. In the area of social justice he has been most interested in juvenile justice issues consistently opposing the trying of minors as adults for any reason, as well as torture, capital punishment and nuclear weapons. He is a friend of the Catholic Worker movement founded in 1933 by journalist and social activist Dorothy Day in New York City. He looks forward to one day delving more deeply into the contemplative heart of that movement in the heart of the city. Currently, he serves as pastor at Our Lady of Sorrows Parish, Corona Queens, NY, one of the largest Latino immigrant communities in the region, where he advocates for immigration reform and the more just and merciful treatment of immigrants, especially at the southern border, including the immediate reunification of children separated from their parents at that border.

Warren Klein to Present “Why is this Book Different than all Other Books? A Glimpse into the Changing Imagery of the Illustrated Haggadah” Apr. 22, 2019

Haggadah illustrationsOn Monday, April 22, Warren Klein, curator of the Herbert and Eileen Bernard Museum of Judaica, will present "Why is this Book Different than all Other Books? A Glimpse into the Changing Imagery of the Illustrated Haggadah." The talk will be held at the UConn Stamford campus in MPR 108 from 12:15-1:45 pm. Lunch will be served.

The talk is free and open to the public.  It is sponsored by the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life. If you require an accommodation, please contact Stamford Coordinator for Judaic Studies Professor Fred Roden at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or 203-251-8559.

About the Talk

Several image cycles and representations in the Passover Haggadah will be examined, beginning from medieval manuscript illumination through the 20th century. Special attention will be placed on the representation of the 4 sons, order of the seder, and ceremonial foods. 

About the Speaker

Warren Klein has been the curator of the Herbert and Eileen Bernard Museum of Judaica at Temple Emanu-El since 2013. His exhibitions have included graphic posters, contemporary Jewish wedding gowns, Golda Meir, and, most recently, Jews and Chocolate. Previously, he worked at the JTS Library, Skirball Museum in Los Angeles, Magnes Museum in Berkeley, and several private collections in New York. He holds an MA in Jewish Art from the Jewish Theological Seminary and a BA in the History of Art from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

 

Professor Jerrilynn Dodds to Present “Christians, Jews, and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Art and Political Identity” on January 29, 2019

ArtworkOn Tuesday, January 29, Professor Jerrilynn Dodds will present "Christians, Jews, and Muslims in Medieval Spain: Art and Political Identity" for this year's Maria and Ishier Jacobson Lecture. The lecture will be held at the UConn Stamford campus in MPR 108 from 5:30-7:00 pm. Refreshments will be served.

The program is free and open to the public. It is made possible by the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life Ishier Jacobson Fund for Judaic & Middle Eastern Studies. If you require an accommodation to participate, please contact Stamford Coordinator for Judaic Studies Professor Roden at frederick.roden@uconn.edu or 203-251-8559.

About the Talk

In the 700 years in which Christians, Muslims and Jews interacted in Islamic Spain, every conceivable kind of interaction occurred: open hostility, resistance, acculturation, and one of the most creative and cooperative levels of interaction known in the Middle Ages. Through art and architecture, this lecture will explore how the confessional and cultural diversity of the Spanish Middle Ages transformed the culture of Medieval Europe.

About the Speaker

Dr. Jerrilynn Dodds holds the Harlequin Adair Dammann Chair in the History of Art at Sarah Lawrence College and lectures/consults at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her work centers on transculturation and how art/architecture forms identity. Dodds' books include Arts of Intimacy: Christians, Jews and Muslims in the Making of Castilian Culture and Architecture and Ideology of Early Medieval Spain. In 2018 she received the Cross of the Order of Civil Merit from the Government of Spain.

Pride & Prejudice: South Asian LGBTQ Alliance October 24, 2018

Pride and Prejudice

Wed. Oct. 24, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM, UConn Stamford Art Gallery: The UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life will co-sponsor a panel on national coming out month to learn about the Bangladeshi LGBTQ community and celebrate pride with the members of Roopbaan and the voices of the community. 

The program is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Please register to attend at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pride-prejudice-south-asian-lgbtq-alliance-tickets-48723100104

About the Event

On April 25, 2016, Xulhaz Mannan and K Mahbub Rabbi, activists in Dhaka, Bangladesh were murdered by Islamic extremists for advocating LGBT rights as the founders of Roopbaan, the first LGBT magazine in Bangladesh.

Roopbaan has become a platform that strives to advance LGBT rights to love in a country that proclaims their love as illegal and punishable by law.

It is important to address the questions of violence, safety, and identity in the face of discrimination against the South Asian and Muslim LGBT community.

A creative segment will be included for art, poetry, and photography.

This program is co-sponsored by the UConn Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life, Cobs Bread, GLSEN Connecticut, People's United Bank, Sholay Productions, Staples, Stop and Shop, and Triangle Community Center.